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PyHC Spring 2021 Meeting Dates Announced.

PyHC serves as a community knowledge base for performing heliophysics research in Python, aiming to provide a variety of tutorials and resources, a list of useful packages, general discussion, and advice. Twice yearly, PyHC meets in person. These meetings are open to anyone, from individuals already utilizing Python heavily in developing open-source heliophysics packages to those who are just getting into using Python and open source development.

PyHC’s first meeting of 2021 will be held remotely on Zoom. The meeting will run Monday, May 10th, 2021 - Thursday, May 13th, 2021, from 9 AM - 11 AM MT each day. The Zoom sessions will be recorded. We’ll hold tutorial, hackathon, and core project update sessions, as well as a couple other discussions that are relevant to the community. See the full agenda for dates/times of the various sessions.

The meeting’s web page can be found here. Registration, which is free, but required, can be found here. The meeting’s web page also has a link to registration, as well as the Zoom telecon information. If you’d like to join our mailing list to learn more information about the meeting and other upcoming events, please see the PyHC Contact page for instructions. We also have a Riot chat group where we discuss various PyHC issues/topics, as well as discussing other Python-related questions.

Registration Deadline: COB, Friday, May 7th, 2021.
Note: If you already registered and later decide to change your registration, you should be able to do that directly, but if you experience any difficulties please email Julie Barnum or Shawn Polson.


New PyHC Logo

We have a new PyHC logo! Thank you to graphic designer Dayana Gonzalez for her excellent design work, and thank you to all our community members who provided input on it. Follow this link to a GitHub repo where you can find the logo in a variety of image formats and resolutions.


PyHC Fall 2020 Meeting Dates Announced.

PyHC serves as a community knowledge base for performing heliophysics research in Python, aiming to provide a variety of tutorials and resources, a list of useful packages, general discussion, and advice. Twice yearly, PyHC meets in person. These meetings are open to anyone, from individuals already utilizing Python heavily in developing open-source heliophysics packages to those who are just getting into using Python and open source development.

PyHC’s second meeting of 2020 will be held remotely on Zoom over a four-week-long period, starting Monday, October 26th, 2020 and ending Monday, November 16th, 2020. We’ll hold tutorial, hackathon, and unconference sessions, as well as hold a few plenaries during which we’ll have presentations on topics relevant to the community. See the full agenda for exact dates/times of the various sessions. The meeting’s web page can be found here. Registration, which is free, but required, can be found here. The meeting’s web page also has a link to registration, as well as the Zoom telecon information. If you’d like to join our mailing list to learn more information about the meeting and other upcoming events, please see the PyHC Contact page for instructions. We also have a Riot chat group where we discuss various PyHC issues/topics, as well as discussing other Python-related questions.

Registration Deadline: COB, Friday, October 23rd, 2020.
Note: If you already registered and later decide to change your registration, you should be able to do that directly, but if you experience any difficulties please email Julie Barnum or Shawn Polson.


PyHC Spring 2020 Meeting Dates Announced.

PyHC serves as a community knowledge base for performing heliophysics research in Python, aiming to provide a variety of tutorials, resources, a list of useful packages, general discussion, and advice. Twice yearly, PyHC meets in person. These meetings are open to anyone from individuals already utilizing Python heavily in developing open-source heliophysics packages, as well as those who are just getting into using Python and open source development.

PyHC’s first meeting of 2020 will be held remotely on Zoom Wednesday, April 29th, 2020 9 AM - 12 PM MT. We’ll discuss PyHC Project updates as well as plans for the (hopefully) in-person Fall meeting. The meeting’s website can be found here. Registration, which is free, but required, can be found here. The meeting’s website also has a link to registration, as well as the Zoom telecon information. If you’d like to join our mailing list to learn more information about the meeting and other upcoming events, please see the PyHC Contact page for instructions. We also have a Riot chat group where we discuss various PyHC issues/topics, as well as discussing other Python-related questions.

Registration Deadline: COB, Thursday, April 23rd
Note: If you already registered and later decide to change your registration (i.e., from in-person to remote), then please email Julie Barnum or Nick Murphy.


Applications Open for the Better Scientific Software Program Fellowship

The Better Scientific Software (BSSw) organization is now accepting applications to their Fellowship Program. Applications are due on October 15th.

The goal of the BSSw Fellowship program “is to foster and promote practices, processes, and tools to improve developer productivity and software sustainability of scientific codes”. The bulk of the applications process is a proposal for a one-year funded activity that promotes development or use of better scientific software. This year’s fellows’ projects focus on best practices for developing research software, reducing technical debt in scientific software, debugging and improving reliability in scientific appllications, and understanding social challenges in the evolution of scientific software products. The award is $25,000; applicants must be affiliated with a US-based institution that is eligible to receive DoE funds.

BSSw aims to “address pressing challenges in software productivity, quality, and sustainability.” It comprises multiple communities with connections to various fields of science and computing, with the over-arching goal of promoting awareness of good software practices in science.

Those who are not interested in applying to the fellowship program but who still want to consider contributing to BSSw can go here.